Who invented radioactive dating used for the turin shroud

A January 20, 2005 article in the scholarly, peer-reviewed scientific journal Thermochimica Acta (Volume 425, pages 189-194, by Raymond N.

Rogers, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of California) makes it perfectly clear: the carbon 14 dating sample cut from the Shroud in 1988 was not valid.

What ends up being tested is a mixture of old and new material which produces an average, meaningless carbon 14 age.

No one seemed to consider, in 1988, that material intrusion might be a serious problem with the Shroud of Turin carbon 14 dating even though clues were there.

It should not be ignored when journalists and authors write about carbon 14 dating.

There are textbooks, encyclopedias and many websites to be updated. It is an extraordinary technology that with uncanny precision can count the approximately one in a trillion carbon 14 isotopes that exist compared to the more common carbon 12 and carbon 13 isotopes; isotopes that exist in all living material and material that once was living.

who invented radioactive dating used for the turin shroud-47

Gum material is swelling and detaching from fibers.

Very old bogs often contain miniscule roots from newer plants that grew in the peat.

The roots of these plants, sometimes having decomposed, are nearly indistinguishable from the older peat.

For material that is only a few thousand years old, carbon 14 dating is very accurate and very reliable.

Because of the carbon 14 dating, the Shroud of Turin, a religious object important to Christians of many traditions (Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, Protestant and Evangelical; conservative and liberal alike) has been cast into the spotlight of secular science.

Leave a Reply